Math@IMSA: Wednesday

Math@IMSA: Wednesday

Today students took their knowledge of sequence and applied it to encrypted text. Learning to decrypt a Vigenere cipher was an adventure today as students worked together to understand permutations. Students manipulated materials such as cardboard, construction paper, playing chips and represented permutations as functions, cycles and graphs. Students are preparing and excited for the next step where they will design scavenger hunts for their partners using techniques from the past few days!

Ask your student:

What clues might you want to give to someone during a scavenger hunt?

Which encryption technique did they like the best and why?

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

What’s Up with Water? Wednesday: Solubility

What’s Up with Water? Wednesday: Solubility

Throughout the week, our newfound water enthusiasts have conducted various experiments to help them gain a better understanding of the unique properties of water. Today, they learned the difference between a physical and chemical change.

Students collected data for the heating curve of a solution and later compared their results to the heating curve of pure water. The knowledge they have accumulated has already become applicable to their exploration of solutions to global water issues.  “I never realized so many things naturally reacted with one another,” one student mentioned. We can’t wait to see what they come up with next!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Vital Signs @ McKendree – Wednesday: Banana Sutures

Vital Signs @ McKendree – Wednesday: Banana Sutures

Today, our junior medical practitioners performed their first procedure! Students practiced sutures (or “stitches”) the same way that real doctors practice: on banana peels. They primarily investigated the layered nature of the skin, and how it relates to its main function: protection. Some students were surprised to learn that our skin is actually the largest organ in our bodies!

Our fledgling scientists will continue to use their rapidly developing medical skills in the days to come!

Ask your student:

What are the names of the three layers of the skin? (epidermis, dermis, and hypodermis)

What layer of the skin is the thickest? (hypodermis – 26 mm)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.