Musicology @ Aurora – Tuesday

Musicology @ Aurora – Tuesday

Today, the students put on their creative thinking caps when they were tasked to create their own harmonica songs! Ask your child to play their creation (or their mastered Mary had a Little Lamb) for you as they will be bringing their instrument home tonight. These creative juiced kept flowing as the students finished building their electronic instruments and were encouraged to perform a song of their choice for their peers. Additionally, the students put their hands to work by building their own hand-pipe instrument which they will be expanding upon later in the week. To tie this cacophony of sound all together, the students explored an online PHET simulation where they could explore sound wave and their properties further.

 

Ask your students:

If you increase the amplitude of a sound what happens? (The sound becomes louder)

What were the 4 components of your electronic instrument? (Battery, Vibration circuit, speaker, keyboard circuit)

 

Book Recommendation: The Way to Stay in Destiny By Augusta Scattergood

This young adult novel is recommended for 4th-7th grade students.

From Amazon: “When Theo gets off a bus in Destiny, Florida, he’s left behind the only life he’s ever known. Now he’s got to live with Uncle Raymond, a Vietnam War vet and a loner who wants nothing to do with this long-lost nephew. Thank goodness for Miss Sister Grandersole’s Boarding House and Dance School. The piano that sits in Miss Sister’s dance hall calls to Theo. He can’t wait to play those ivory keys. When Anabel arrives things get even more enticing. This feisty girl, a baseball fanatic, invites Theo on her quest to uncover the town’s connection to old-time ball players rumored to have lived there years before. A mystery, an adventure, and a musical exploration unfold as this town called Destiny lives up to its name.”

Micro STEM @ Aurora– Tuesday: Applied Circuitry

Micro STEM @ Aurora – Tuesday: Applied Circuitry

Today, the campers continued working on their hand fans! Now that their main design had been sketched and the handle and main body was build, the budding electrical engineers could start with the circuitry and wiring. Using a small motor, a battery pack, and lots of wires, the campers finally got the head of the fan to move! We can’t wait to see their final projects tomorrow once they add lights and complete the design.

Vital Signs @ Springfield- Tuesday: Sheep Heart Dissection

Vital Signs @ Springfield- Tuesday: Sheep Heart Dissection

Day 2 is over, and our daring dissectors have had an in-depth look at the workings of every mammal’s most important organ: the heart! During their exploration, students continued to recognize the relationship between structure and function that is present everywhere in biological structures. One student commented, “Every piece of the organ has a specific job, and everything is efficient!”

The scientists-in-training will continue to explore this connection between structure and function as the week goes on!

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Vital Signs @ Springfield – Monday: Glasses Galore

Vital Signs @ Springfield – Monday: Glasses Galore

On the first day of a jam-packed week, students delved into bio engineering, specifically creating glasses! Our budding engineers explored the different types of lenses and their ability to magnify and minimize objects from various distances. The campers combined different strengths of lenses to enhance their vision and read ultra-fine print from 6 and 8 feet away.

Ask your student:

Do eyeballs have convex or concave lenses? (convex)

Vital Signs @ Belleville – Friday: Prosthetics

Vital Signs @ Belleville – Friday: Prosthetics

Today, our campers developed prosthetic fingers through the use of their own engineering creativity. Our bold inventors have created their own artificial fingers to scale to fit their own hands, including mechanisms to both bend and unbend the finger at all of the joints. Throughout the week, students have been exploring bio-engineering which has allowed them to become experts at analyzing design solutions and repeatedly testing them in order to determine the best way to improve the product.

Ask your student:

Which tendons are responsible for bending and straightening the fingers? (Flexor and extensor tendons)

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Chemapalooza @ Aurora – Friday: So Sublime

Chemapalooza @ Aurora – Friday: So Sublime

Today students observed first-hand how regular ice and dry ice differ in their behaviors. Students studied both types of ice in one scenario, and used their observations to predict what would happen in a different scenario! Finally, collected evidence to make claims about the strange phase-changing properties of dry ice, created models, and presented them to the group.

Ask your student:  What is it called when a substance goes from a solid straight to a gas? (Sublimation) Ask your student to tell you some of the differences they observed between dry and regular ice.

CSImsa @ Belle Valley – Tuesday: Lift a Finger

CSImsa @ Belle Valley – Tuesday: Lift a Finger

Our CSI team is well on its way to cracking the case! Today, the scientists-in-training delved into the study of fingerprints. They first fingerprinted themselves in order to learn about the different recognizable fingerprint patterns. Students then examined the fingerprint evidence collected from the crime scene and attempted to match it with prints collected later from suspects.

Our investigators have had a busy two days, but there is more forensic science to be done before the culprit can be apprehended!

Ask your student:

What are the three characteristic fingerprint patterns? (loops, whorls, and arches)

After two days, do you have any theories about the case?

 

CSImsa @ Springfield – Monday: Observation 101

CSImsa @ Springfield – Monday: Observation 101

The detectives have called in the CSI unit, and our junior forensic scientists are on the case! The investigation is well under way, with students honing their observation skills by spotting hidden objects in various pictures. They also practiced their mastery of memory and recall by seeing a series of objects and attempting to remember what was shown.

Investigators will continue to utilize their observational talent throughout the week as they attempt to solve the case!

Ask your student:

What evidence have you collected so far in the case?

How did you do in your observation and memory skills practice?

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CSImsa @ Aurora & Belleville – Friday: Drops to DNA Part 2

CSImsa @ Aurora & Belleville – Friday: Drops to DNA Part 2

The case has been cracked! Our junior forensic scientists worked in the lab today in order to extract DNA from the pieces of a broken vase that were found at the crime scene. After analyzing the evidence and comparing it to the DNA samples from several key suspects, the CSI team has identified the culprit!

Students concluded the week with a successfully cracked case, and experience with real CSI science!

Ask your student:

Were your suspicions from earlier in the week correct? If not, what evidence changed them?

Belleville Pictures

Aurora Pictures

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BioSleuths @ Springfield– Tuesday: Honey Bees

BioSleuths @ Springfield – Tuesday: Honey Bees

One of the four areas students investigated today was the intricate social nature of bees and how the different types of bees work together to make honey, the honeycomb, and more bees! As a group, students enacted the roles of the bees in a hive and “produced” their own honey. “I can’t believe bees have to work so hard just to make a little honey!” observed one student.

Our intrepid biosleuths also used manipulatives and geometry to discover how and why honeybees have perfected their honeycomb design and concluded that hexagons are the optimal shape for honeycomb cells.

Ask your student:

From which part of the bee’s body does the wax come? (abdomen)

Which type of bee in the colony builds the honeycomb? (worker)

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