Game Day STEM

Game Day STEM

How does a diver minimize their splash and maximize their score? How can a vaulting pole bend without snapping? How is sports equipment made to accommodate forces? The underlying STEM principles for the sports you know and love will be explored. Students will build and race a robotic swimmer, re-engineer an archer’s bow, and test cycling gears!  Participants will discover how STEM concepts are applied to a variety of sports, helping athletes maximize their performance.

Oceanography

Oceanography

What does it take to be a marine scientist? Become an ocean explorer with us during our brand new ocean-themed STEM experience! Students will follow the engineering design cycle as they design, build, submerge, and test their own submarine. They will also learn the science behind (and model) fascinating ocean-phenomena like bioluminescence, perform dissections of marine creatures (including a squid), and study the ocean’s micro-organisms. If you’re ready – dive in!

Vital Signs

Vital Signs

Is there a doctor in the house? This program provides budding medical students a general understanding of human anatomy through hands-on explorations of the heart, blood, skin, bones and muscles! Participants will perform a (sheep) hearts dissection, practice suturing, explore the physics of blood flow, and much more. They will also engage in a fun and challenging bioengineering project that will allow them to apply engineering principles and practices to the structure and function of the human body.

Engineering Explorations

Engineering Explorations

Design, tinker, build, test—then do it again! Working in teams, participants will engage in hands-on activities as they explore the engineering design process through electrical, chemical, and biomedical engineering. Students will design, build, and race boats, build a solar powered car, and test the principles of force and motion through a week-long Rube Goldberg project culminating in a competition.

Space & Weather

Space & Weather

IMSA’s weather forecast for Summer 2019…? “Cloudy with a chance of meteors!” We are hosting a camp that will explore the space and weather phenomena that have fascinated humans for centuries. Students will have to “think like an astronaut (or aerospace engineer or meteorologist)” in order to take on a series of space/weather-related challenges including how to design space gear that can withstand the harsh environs of outer space, capture lightning in a bottle, and use chemical reactions to launch rockets. Along the way, there will be some close encounters with glowing galactic goo, swirling satellites, and helpful hovercrafts. Come join us for a week that will be out-of-this world!

Makey Lab

Makey Lab

Calling all mini-Makers! Have you ever wanted to develop and assemble your own toy? Light up your creations? Build a waterslide? Students will hone their inquiring, designing, creating, and building skills on multiple engaging projects. Throughout the week they will be learning about circuits, physics, engineering, and even coding a dance that other students will perform. So put on your thinking caps and come join us makers!

Chemapalooza!

Chemapalooza!

There will be a Chemistry Party happening at IMSA when this popular camp returns for the coming summer. Join us as we conduct experiments to explore the cool chemistry behind molecular gastronomy, elephant toothpaste, and everyone’s favorite: colorful water beads. Our budding chemists will get the chance to write secret messages using “highly classified” chemical solutions, grow their own crystal gardens, and even create (and eat) their own ice cream recipes! Be sure to join us at Chemapalooza!

Musicology – Friday

Musicology – Friday

Today, students put final touches on their hand-pipe machines, creating a mechanism similar to a music box, and continued their experiments on digital vs. analog transmissions. They then learned how musical reeds work and even created their own reed-like instrument using straws. Finally, students put all their knowledge of music together by defining what made music “good” to them. They used this knowledge to categorize and rate music that their peers might like as well.

Ask your students:

How does a reed work? (it vibrates when you blow into in, thus creating a sound)

What does binary mean? (Something composed of 2 parts; a digital signal is composed of 1’s and 0’s)

Book Recommendation: A Crooked Kind of Perfect By Linda Urban

This young adult novel is recommended for 5th-7th grade students.

From Amazon: “Ten-year-old Zoe Elias has perfect piano dreams. She can practically feel the keys under her flying fingers; she can hear the audience’s applause. All she needs is a baby grand so she can start her lessons, and then she’ll be well on her way to Carnegie Hall.

But when Dad ventures to the music store and ends up with a wheezy organ instead of a piano, Zoe’s dreams hit a sour note. Learning the organ versions of old TV theme songs just isn’t the same as mastering Beethoven on the piano. And the organ isn’t the only part of Zoe’s life that’s off-kilter, what with Mom constantly at work, Dad afraid to leave the house, and that odd boy, Wheeler Diggs, following her home from school every day.

 

Yet when Zoe enters the annual Perform-O-Rama organ competition, she finds that life is full of surprises–and that perfection may be even better when it’s just a little off center”

Micro STEM @ Aurora – Friday: Homemade Batteries

Micro STEM @ Aurora – Friday: Homemade Batteries

On our final day of Micro STEM, the campers made their own batteries! First campers made a hand battery. The hand battery works with a piece of aluminum and a copper sheet, which are conductors. They used their own body’s electric charge by placing a hand on each of the plates, then measured the electrical output with a multi-meter.

Ask your student:

What materials did you use for the aluminum air battery? Aluminum foil, paper towel, salt water, and activated charcoal.

 

 

Micro STEM @ Aurora – Thursday: Magnifying Investigations

Micro STEM @ Aurora – Thursday: Magnifying Investigations

Today, the investigation of different kinds of magnifying devices continued. Students got the chance to go outside and collect various samples of their choice. After collection, the samples were brought inside to be analyzed with a compound light microscope. Students also reviewed the various parts of a compound microscope, and the importance of each part in the function of the microscope as a whole.

Ask your student:

What similarities and differences did you notice when you were using the different tools for magnification (MicroPhone lens, hand lens, compound light microscope, and stereoscope)?